Greece - Nemea

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Greece - Nemea

Greece, with the capital city of Athens and a population of 11.2 million ranks number 97 among the 100 largest countries in the world.  One of the most famous monuments is the Parthenon. A temple built in honor of Athena, the patron saint of the city of Athens, was the result of the collaboration of important architects and sculptors in the mid 5th century BC. The time of construction coincides with the ambitious expansion plans of Athens and the policy of prestige pursued toward the ally towns during the Athenian hegemony in Ancient Greece. The temple which was built at the Acropolis (the highest point of a city in ancient times that was fortified) was completed in 438 BC.
The Nemean region, situated just 115 kilometers southwest of Athens, is linked to numerous myths and traditions. It became better known because of the famous “Labour” of Hercules, the defeat of the fearsome lion that used to prey on the area. The Nemean Lion was a beast of tremendous force, rage and size which lived in a cave with two exits on Mount Triton. The Semi-god hero blocked one of the exits of the cave trapping the animal inside, struck it with his bat, and finally strangled it with his bare hands. In the land of Nemea, according to the legend, reigned Flias, son of Dionysus (god of wine), who founded the town that bore his name, Fliasia. According to a version of the legend, the vine was cultivated for the first time here and wine was produced, the famous fliasios wine. The vine is considered to have been God's gift to his mortal son.
During the Byzantine period Nemea used to be called  St. George from the homonymous Byzantine church from which also derives the name of the famous grape variety, Agiorgitiko. The presence of the variety Agiorgitiko, and generally the cultivation of vines and the production of wine, has been reported in the region since 2000 BC.
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